6 Ways to Build a Stunning Resume as a College Student

When was the last time you learned a new skills? Can’t remember when you last updated your resume? Join us for our FREE virtual workshop: “Skills Upgrade: A Digital Marketing Workshop” with New Marketing Institute. This one-time opportunity is the perfect chance to get certified training in digital marketing and pragmatic, and land the tech, design, advertising, and creative positions of your dreams. Learn more & register: findspark.com/event/digital-marketing-workshop


If you’re still looking for a summer internship or job, use these tips to build a stunning resume, blow those recruiters away, and get the dream job you want.

FindSpark Resume

Photo courtesy of Boris Riabov

1. Create a custom LinkedIn URL and add it to your resume.

LinkedIn is the most popular professional networking tool nowadays. More and more college students and professionals use LinkedIn as an online resume. But did you know that you can create your own specific URL for your public profile? Learn how here.

A custom URL will make you stand out from other candidates. After customizing your profile URL, don’t forget to put it on your resume so recruiters can easily view your profile.

Stella Jiang's LinkedIn Custom URL

To show off even more of your work, you can create your own free personal website (with no experience in coding) using Wix.com.

2. Write a short summary to amaze others.

Don’t rush into putting your fabulous GPA and amazing internship experiences on your resume. It can be difficult to show recruiters what a good fit you are through just a one-page resume; how are they supposed to understand your personality?

A brief summary below your contact info on your resume is a great way to tell recruiters who you are and what you’re interested in. Customize your summary according to each job description and your understanding of the company culture. You will get unbelievable results from just a small change in your resume.

3. Use key words in job descriptions.

Having problems finding professional verbs and adjectives to describe your past experience? Have a look at the job description of the position you’re applying for!

Here’s an excerpt from a position on our job board. “Assist”, “support”, “coordinate” and “oversee” are professional verbs that you can use to describe your experience. “Marketing content,” “copywriting,” and “SEO” are key words and skills you should include in your experience, as well, since those are the terms the employer will be looking for on your resume.

Marketing Fellowship

4. Don’t ignore what you do at school.

Feel like you don’t have enough professional experience as a college student? Get that thought out of your mind, now. As a student, you have tons of opportunities to get experience.

Do you remember working days and nights with your partners for a group proposal? This experience can be a good example to show that you are a team player and a person who can work with strict deadlines. Put one or two great class projects or your experience in student clubs on your resume. They will help to prove that you have specific professional skill sets until you get more real-world experience.

5. Create resumes for each industry that interests you.

Don’t want to keep editing your resume every time you apply for a position? Prepare different resumes in areas that you want to get into.

Put all your internship experience, class works and student activities experience related to a specific field in a customized resume. Then, put all your resumes for different areas in a resume portfolio. That way, you’ll only have to make small tweaks to the specific job description. A resume portfolio will save you a lot of time especially when you want to apply for jobs with different skill sets in different areas.

6. Keep your resume in one page.

We all want to put all amazing experiences on our resumes to show recruiters that we are the perfect fits for positions. However, a resume that’s longer than a page can be overwhelming for recruiters when they have to go through tons of resumes every day.

Only put concise experience with proactive verbs and distinct results related to a particular job position on your resume. For example, it’s more efficient to put your freelance experience in graphic design instead of your marketing research internship last summer when you apply for a graphic designer position.

What’s your favorite part of your resume? Leave a comment below!


When was the last time you learned a new skills? Can’t remember when you last updated your resume? Join us for our FREE virtual workshop: “Skills Upgrade: A Digital Marketing Workshop” with New Marketing Institute. This one-time opportunity is the perfect chance to get certified training in digital marketing and pragmatic, and land the tech, design, advertising, and creative positions of your dreams. Learn more & register: findspark.com/event/digital-marketing-workshop

 

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